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Posts Tagged ‘empathy’

Some time ago a good friend had been gathering clothes

Unconditionally given by people she knows

 

One boy

 

No country

No fixed home

No family

 

She says

please take anything you want

 

He picks only

one sweater

one t-shirt

 

She says:

Would you not like one shirt?

 

I already have three shirts, thank you

Maybe someone else need them

 

 

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In my life I have indeed met some truly good people.

I come to think of it today since

I might have left a truly good woman

giving unconditional love.

 

Sometimes I feel there is something wrong with the world,

but hen I remember:

 

If we see good we don’t think that all is good.

When we see one thing or person being bad,

we generalize and many think that all persons or situations similar must be equally bad.

 

So why should not the opposite also be true?

You see one thing good = more things are good!

If it is, the world is not half as bad as I thought.

There is at least as much good as there is bad.

In fact the people that do good (uncoditionally) are many times not seen,

but they are there, among us everywhere.

Many of them are not older than they can show with their fingers.

 

I am talking about unconditional good

without any expectation of getting anything back at all:

 

leaving nice and comforting notes in a book at the library for a mother to be,

so called guerrilla goodness.

Or letting a refugee live in your house until ready to move on.

Or the unselfish goodness that happens when you most need it:

 

Some 18 years ago (before mobile phones and digital cameras)

I left my home in a hurry. Brokenhearted I spent my last money and flew to the other side of the world.

In the south of Mexico I chopped and cleared jungle for roads to pass,

people gave me food that was left over when restaurants closed,

poor families sharing what little food they had on trains that traveled so slow it took days to get where you were going.

Those were unselfish acts as well as the five Mariachis escorting me from parts of Mexico City in which I would not have lasted long.

Or the veterinarian taking me into his home, treating my typhoid fever for weeks without asking for nothing in return.

 

But above all

the little Zapotec boy

with torn clothes,

not a half man tall,

that just before nightfall

high up in the Oaxaca mountains

spent all his money

to pay the bus

for a skinny bearded long-haired-giant

a stranger

whom he had never met before

also giving me half his bread to eat

even though I did not understand a word of Chatino.

 

 

That is unconditional good

and

I have not forgotten you little hero

 

 

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“Nipa ye nipa” = “A human being is a human being”

The writing on this wall in Nsoatre, Ghana; in all its simplicity it means more than something I have ever read before.

Please read the post of a young person and very new blogger  who jolted the memory of  this photo and you will see the truth of the message expressed in a remarkable way far away from Ghana.

“we must have spectacles

through which we can see beyond

the prostitutes … ” 

(click and read the full spectacles post here)

Written by a very wise girl named Rida.  My guess is in Pakistan because of two clues: the language Urdu and the money rupee

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I cried for the first time in a long while.

Not only out of sorrow.

My tears went rolling down my cheeks as I realized how many people out there are doing good and how many people actually let their hearts guide them.

 

I love you

I love you for seeing the person and not the illness

I love you for seeing the individual and not the disability

I love you for talking to the person carried by the wheel chair and not to the person pushing it

I love you for doing good for others

I love you for not being afraid to still visit your neighbor, friend or workmate when they or someone in their family is struggeling.

I love you for being there when you are not sure what to do.

 

Hala

In Sweden, the apartment buildings most of the time has a slot in the door for the mailman to deliver the mail. It is about an inch wide 3 feet above ground and just wide enough to put your fingers through it after opening the lid.

I lived in a place where my neighbor was the sweetest father I have ever seen. Always outside playing with his little daughter for hours at a time, the youngest of four children. Her birthday is on February 14, easy to remember because of Valentine’s day. Such an adorable child, full of energy, curly locks and big brown eyes.

As soon as she started walking she used to stand on the balcony of the first floor greeting people going in and out of the building, always putting a smile on my face.

One day,

as I was walking up the stairs inside the building,

I heard my name echo in a fragile voice.

I turned around and saw no one.

I kept walking and there it was again:

 

david … david … david

 

I walked back down a couple of steps and through the slot three feet up  in the door of the first floor I saw the most adorable pair of eyes looking at me.

 

Today Hala is 4 almost 5.

She is a fighter, and a bundle of Palestinian-Swedish joy.

Hala has been and still is fighting a vicious cancer for several years. Her family’s weapon in this fight is never ending love. Something they will need as the struggle continues.

Donna

Today I read Donna’s story

Chris led me to it.

That is why I cried.

Today 3 out of 4 kids in Sweden survive cancer. My best friend did too, even though the odds in the 80s were not good. Please help improving those odds.

In Sweden: http://barncancerfonden.se/

In the US: http://www.childrenscancer.org/main/ways_to_donate/

or help Chris and Donna’s Good Things here

Love can take us far but money will do too. Many small drops makes a river in the end.

Stay strong warriors of love!

To Remind me

Please people add more links in the comment section, especially for other countries

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Sometimes something that is a little bit bad can bring out something good.

A couple of 12/13-year-old-boys was teasing a girl at the school I teach. Not saying anything really bad, just teasing her, which is enough to make someone sad.

A few days later I spoke to one little boy and asked him if he knew why I wanted to talk to him. (He had just jumped on the teasing train as the last person, not really knowing what it was about).

His big eyes looked up on me like two huge question marks.

When he heard that a girl was sad and realized he had a part in it,

compassion, empathy and sadness filled the big brown eyes.

A small heart grew greater than his little body and was crying out.

With tears watering his eyes,

small almost silent words formed on his lips as he asked

“How can one make sadness go away when you have hurt someone?”

“We must find the girl so that I can apologize”

Sitting there I understood that I had just witnessed a small miracle. In that boys heart lies our future. And it can be a good one.

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